October 10, 2019 0

Learn Dutch Alphabet + Pronunciation


Hi there welcome to learndutch.org In this video lesson: the
Dutch alphabet and its pronunciation. Believe me, if you
plan to learn Dutch, this is the most important lesson you
will ever have and I strongly recommend to go
through this well in the beginning of your studies, because correcting pronunciation at a later stage will cost you much more efforts. It is certainly not our most exciting lesson but you simply have to, if you want to
understand the Dutch and you want the Dutch to understand you. First, I will read the alphabet in Dutch. So, you know how we call the letters. Then I will discuss each letter in detail. The majority of the letters is
like in English but the vowels and some consonants are
different. And then (and this is quite difficult for
foreigners): the combination of vowels, so-called diphthongs, and in the end combination of
consonants. Let’s start with the right Dutch pronunciation of the alphabet
itself: 26 letters In the rest of the lesson, when I refer to the letters, I
call them in Dutch. So, when I say [e] it is this letter and not this one, and when I say [i] it’s this one not this. Okay, if you’re ready for the real job, let’s start ! The letter [a] can be pronounced two ways: short: as [a] and long: as [aa]. A vowel is pronounced short when the end of a syllable is a consonant like in “kat” which means: cat and plural: “katten” The extra [t] is to stress that in plural the short sound [a] should be
preserved. The long sound is pronounced with two [a]s after each other, like in “raam”, which means: window or when one [a] is not followed by a consonant at the
end of the syllable, like in “ramen” which is plural. the letter [b] like in: “Bart”, (which is my name). There are some words that end on a [b] which is then pronounced like a [p] [p] like “web”. Same meaning as in English. I will use the purple in the rest of the video, when one letter is
pronounced actually as an other. the letter [c] can be pronounced as an [s] like in “civiel” which means: civil, or as a [k] like in: Castricum, which is the name of
a village the letter [d] like in “dat” which means: that, But at the end of the word, the [d] is pronounced at [t] like in “woord” which means: word. The letter [e] as short vowel: [e] as long vowel: [ee] “gek” which means: crazy “‘veel” which means: many The only exception of to [e]s not pronounced as [e] is in the article “een” which means: a, You can pronounce this word also as “een”, but then it means the digit 1. The [e] is pronounced as “uh”, when it is in an unstressed syllable as in: “lopen” which means: to walk the letter [f] like in “fiets” which means: bike (the Dutch Way of Transportation!) the [g] clearly different from English and for most foreigners an unusual rough sound [g] like in “groot” which means: big the letter [h] like in “hand” which means: hand the letter [i] The [i] as short vowel is pronounced as [i] and as long vowel as [ie], “kip” means: chicken “lief” means: lovely Now the [i]s long vowel is an exception in
writing. Where the other long sounds are written as two of the same letters, with [i] it is a combination of [i] and [e] In two specific situations, the [i] is pronounced as “uh” when the word has an unstressed ending on [i] plus [g] like in: “smerig” which means: dirty And [i] plus [s], like in “notaris” which means: notary the letter [j] like in “jaar”, which means: year the letter [k] like in “klomp” which means: wooden shoe (clog) the letter [l] like in “laat” which means: late the letter [m], like in “man” which means: man the letter [n], like in “nu” which means: now the letter [o] as short vowel: [o], as long vowel [oo], “bos” which means: forest, “boom” which means: tree the letter [p], like in “potlood”, which means: pencil the letter [q], [q] is only used in foreign words followed by the letter [u] pronounced as [kw] like in “aquarium” (same as in English) the letter [r] like in “raam” (window) the letter [s] like in “stom” which means: stupid the letter [t] like in “taal” which means: language There is one exception: sometimes (not always though) when the [t] is follow by an [i], it is pronounced [ts], like in “politie” (police) the letter [u] as short vowel pronounced as: “uh” and as long vowel as [uu] “bus” (same meaning as in English) “muur”, which means: wall the letter [v] like in “veel”, which means: many In Dutch, the [v] is pronounced quite close to the [f]. the letter [w] like in “water” (which means the same as
in English) There are some words that start with a [w] followed by an [r] In this case you pronounce the [w] as [v] like in “wraak” (revenge) the letter [x] like in “xylofoon” (which means the same as an
English) [y] In spelling we say Y-grec or “Griekse Y” (Greek Y). pronounced like [i] as in “xylofoon” or [j], like in “rayon” The letter [z] like in “zon” which means: sun That was the alphabet. But in terms of pronunciation, the real
difficult stuff starts only now. Let’s deal with the vowel combinations. In other words: diphthongs [e] plus [i] together, makes the sound [ei] like in “weinig” which means: few [i] plus [j]” is also pronounced as [ij] like in the word “jij” which means: you Exception: when word ends on: [lijk] then it is pronounced as ‘luck’ like in “lelijk” which means: ugly [o] plus [u] makes [ou] like in “koud” which means: cold [a] plus [u] makes [au] as well like in “pauze” which means: break [o] plus [e] makes [oe] like in “koe”, which means: cow [u] plus [i] makes [ui] like in “huis”, which means: house [e] plus [u] makes [eu] like in “leuk” which means: funny These specific combinations are pronounced like [eeuw] and [ieuw] like in “leeuw” which means: lion and “nieuw” which means: new These letter combinations are pronounced like [aai], [ai], [ooi], [oi], [oei] like in “fraai”, which means: nice “mooi” means: beautiful and “hoi”, which means: hi And that’s it for the vowel combinations. Let’s now deal with the consonant combinations. [c] plus [h] makes [g] same sound as the letter [g] like in “lachen” which means: to laugh, but it can also be pronounced as [sj] like in “chocolade” (chocolate) [s] plus [j] makes [sj] like in “meisje”, which means: girl [s] plus [c] plus [h] [sch] like in “school” it’s difficult to pronounce, but
really a lot of dutch words start with this letter combination. [n] plus [g] makes [ng] like in “ding” which means: thing [n] plus [k] makes [nk] same as an English, like in “dank” which means: thanks And for the English: [k] plus [n] we pronounce both! so “knie” means: knee And that’s all! And the next words are
difficult but you can do it with the knowledge of this video lesson: “huisgenoten” which means: housemates “achtentachtig” which means: eighty eight “ruggengraat” which means: backbone “koeieuier” which is the cow’s udder You now know how to pronounce dutch
words. It’s a lot of information. And for a good understanding I recommend to
watch back this video a few times. More online courses
you can find on learndutch.org There is also written version of
this lesson. Do not forget to subscribe to my YouTube
channel! I regularly post new video lessons for learning Dutch If you find his lesson useful, you’ll
do me a great favor to like and share it in social media. If you have questionsjust comment on this video in YouTube and I will personally answer. See you back on our website. Or as we say in Dutch: “tot ziens”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© Copyright 2019. Amrab Angladeshi. Designed by Space-Themes.com.