November 4, 2019 0

How to Find and Replace Microsoft Word Formatting


Hello, my name is Erin and in this
tutorial I’m going to show you two methods to find and replace formatting
in Microsoft Word. First we’ll look at how to find and
replace formatting applied anywhere in the document. Then we’ll look at how to
find and replace formatting applied to specific text. We’ll close with some extra
tips that may help you avoid trouble because finding and replacing formatting
in Word isn’t always straightforward. I’ll be doing this demonstration and
word 2016 but the steps are similar in Word 2013 and Word 2010, although the interface may look a bit
different. For this example we are going to find
all text with italic font and replace it with regular font. Of course, you can
modify these steps to meet your own needs. To begin select your Home tab.
Select replace to display the Find and Replace dialog box. Now insert your cursor in the Find What
text box and then select More. From there, select Format and then select Font. In the Find Font dialog box. select Italic, and then select OK. The words “Font: italic” should now appear under the Find What text box. Now insert your cursor in the Replace
With text box, select Format, and then select Font again. In the Replace Font
dialog box select Regular and then select OK. Now the words “Font: not bold, not italic” should appear under the Replace With text box. Select Replace All to make all the replacements at once or use Find Next and Replace to make one replacement at a time. For this example we’ll use Replace All. Select Close when you’re done. Now let’s find formatting applied to specific text. For this example we’ll find the word “copyediting” with Word’s Heading 2
style applied to it and replace it with the same word with a Heading 3 style
instead. To begin, select your Home tab, if you’re
not there already. Select Replace to display the Find and
Replace dialog box. Type “copyediting” into the Find What text box and then
select More, Format, and Style . In the Find Style dialog box, select Heading 2 and then select OK. The words “Style: Heading 2” should now
appear under the Find What text box. Retype “copyediting” in the Replace With
text box, and then select Format and Style. In the Replace Style dialog box
select Heading 3 and OK. The words “Style: Heading 3” should now
appear under the Replace With text box. Once again you can select Replace All to
make all the replacements at once or use Find Next and Replace to make one
replacement at a time. we’ll use Replace All again. Select Close when you’re done. Now I’d like to share a few tips with
you. First Word’s Find and Replace tool has a
lot of helpful options, many more than can be covered in this tutorial, so be
sure to take some time to explore all of the options in the dialog box to see if
it can help you automate any of the replacement tasks that you would
normally do manually. Second, when you add formatting to the Fine and Replace dialog box, it will normally keep that addition in the dialog box until you
save your file and close the software. If you want to delete previous selections
from the Find and Replace dialog box before then, place your cursor in the
affected text box and then select No Formatting. My third tip may be the most important. Occasionally the formatting options
entered into the Replace With text box don’t replace the options in the Find
What text box. Instead, they are added to the options in the Find What text box. When this occurs, experiment with
multiple replacement sequences to reach the formatting you need. For example, if you put the bold format into the Find What text box and put the italic format
into the Replace With text box, Word won’t replace the bold text with italics as you might expect. Instead, it adds the italics to the bold
words. But you can still remove the bold format if you do a second replacement
sequence, this time replacing the bold font with the not bold format option. As we’ve just seen, Words Find and
Replace methods can get a bit complex sometimes. So my fourth tip is to always do a test
run on a secondary copy of your document. Finally when you’re editing someone
else’s writing, whether a client’s or coworker’s or a fellow student, always ask
how much format editing you should do. Some writers want you to edit as many
issues as possible, while others want you to concentrate solely on the writing and
may become grumpy if you unexpectedly changed their bold words to italics. In
addition, you don’t want to accidentally step on the toes of any typesetters or
other formatters involved in the project. Thank you for watching. If you would like
to see this tutorial in written format, please visit my corresponding blog post
link in the Show More section below. Feel free to leave me a comment if you have a question about Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat that you’d like me to address in
a future video and please subscribe for more tutorials on writing, editing, and
document software.

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