October 13, 2019 0

Handwriting advice: the tripod grip

Handwriting advice: the tripod grip


Lovely writing; I like the way you’re staying
on the line, and you’ve got the spacing. I like the way you hold you pen with the thumb
and first finger pinching, with your middle finger like a shell, that’s perfect. I like
the way… can you write the word quick again for me? The angle of the… if I turn it that
way, that’s it… I like the way you’ve got it angling towards you, rather than away from
you; you’ve got your hand on the paper, keeping it still, and you’ve got it angling uphill
which means you can see what your pencil point’s doing when you’re writing. In an ideal sense, what you want is what we
call a dynamic tripod grasp, dynamic meaning active, so it moves. But what you want is
what we call separation of hand, so that the ring and the little finger stay still and
this side of the hand works independently to the other side of the hand, because what
you’re going to do is use less muscles for writing. If you do what I call a more thumb-wrapping
grasp, you get more of the muscles involved, and a lot of children complain of pain in
the wrist or you can see their tendons are very, very tight here. So ideally you want
separation of hand, wrist stable, working downhill because I’m leftie, uphill if you’re
a rightie, and just really getting that distal control because you’re using less muscles
so therefore it’s more efficient, more ergonomically streamlined. And also if you look at handwriting, if it’s
very spiky, then you know that really the whole hand’s involved, but if you’ve got nice
rounded letters chances are they’ve got good distal motor control which means they’ve got
that interaction between the flex and the extensors and what we call the adductor…
I don’t want to get too technical. But you want that interaction of all the muscles to
get that circular movement.

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