September 5, 2019 0

A Life Dedicated To Calligraphy

A Life Dedicated To Calligraphy


A Life Lived with the Qur’an The Best Form of Writing
Calligraphy The Story of the Dot A Life Dedicated to Calligraphy
Hasan Çelebi Bismillah. Surah al-Fatiha and Baqara Naskh
Calligrapher Sheikh Hamdullah Hadith Thuluth Naskh
Calligrapher Hafız Osman Surah al-Fatiha Jali Thuluth Calligrapher: Hamit Aytaç
Gilding: Tahsin Aykutalp Basmala Diwan al-Jali Calligrapher: Hasan Çelebi
Gilding: Hanefi Dursun There’s a black dot
inside the heart. This dot is called suwayda. Mankind is a dot in the world. It is the essence of the world. The heart is a dot inside mankind. It’s the essence of a human. Suwayda is a dot in the heart,
it is the heart’s essence. Episode 1
The Dot Those who follow the trail
that is opened up to those… …who live their lives almost as
if holding their breaths,… …making every effort to
become worthy of the love of… …serving a sublime will
above all other wills,… …knowing that to serve our
holy book Qur’an Al-Karim… …means to understand
Him and live like Him… …are like worlds
unto themselves that… …have storms raging
upon them,… …shaken by
unprecedented quakes… …yet still having new
blooms every day. This trail is called Calligraphy
and it stems from a single dot. When you look at a fig
from a distance, it is but a dot. But when we draw near
it and split it open… …we see hundreds of
fig seeds inside. Hidden in each seed
is a fig tree. In each fig… …lies a forest of fig trees. The multiplicity in unity
exists within the fig. Just like the fig, calligraphy… …is an art that is composed of
its own peculiar meanings and… …the profoundness
the letters denote,… …each of which is a
world unto itself. In this art, the secret wherein
all letters are hidden is the dot. Undoubtedly, one
of the greatest… …verses of creation is the dot. The dot is the making
of a tree, an animal,… …a human into one within a seed. Dots form the letters and… …letters form the words. Because writing is a service to the
Qur’an, I’ve always said this… It should be worthy of and
fitting for the glory,… …the excellence and the
sanctity of the Qur’an. For this reason, they have
shown great effort. They have looked for the… …best ways to write it… …and they have spared
no effort in doing so. We see this in the masters,
we see this effort. We are working with and immersed
in something that is sacred. Our sacred Qur’an al-Karim. Writing its inscription in the
best way possible. Surah al-Nisa 78 Jali Thuluth Calligrapher: Hasan Çelebi
Gilding: Mustafa Çelebi The art of calligraphy equals
measured fine writing. When speaking of
measurement, as it’s known,… …the dot imprinted by the
width of the pen is the… …measure of each writing. There’s no need to look for a
measure anywhere else. The pen we hold is the
measure of the writing. Which is to say, it has to
follow that measure. There’s also a measure that
calligraphers have put in… …place by experimenting
with the font sizes of the… …letters through a historical
development process. The words calligraphy
and writing are… …used as a definition
for each other. But when you talk about the
fine art of calligraphy,… …you put writing in a
different position. It means, the fine form
of writing, fine writing,… …writing that is inscribed… …with sensitivity and a
concern for aesthetics. When one thinks of the fine art of
calligraphy, what comes to mind… …is the art form that yields the
fine products of the traditional… Turkish – Islamic art of
writing that is exercised… …by creating various
compositions in various forms. What comes to mind are
inscriptions on mosques’ walls,… …writings manually inscribed
inside old manuscripts… …or wonderful works of art… …decorating the walls
of our homes… …written in the
form of a hilya,… …thuluth, naskh
segments or jali style. Fine art of calligraphy is the
name for all of these. The essence of all sciences
is the Qur’an al-Karim. The essence of the Qur’an
al-Karim is Surah al-Fatiha. The essence of
Surah al-Fatiha is… …Bismillahirrahmanirrahim,
the Basmala. The essence of basmala
is the letter “ba”. The essence of the letter “ba”
is the dot underneath it. Every letter has a value,
a measure, a weight… …according to the pen
we have in hand. For instance, the belly
of this “kha” is one dot. This part is two dots. From this point,
this side is three dots. One, two, three. There’s also the width of the “Lam”. If you consider that as
well, it makes a total of… …four and a half, five,
five and a half dots. What we call calligraphy is the… …wedding venue of sheet and ink. It is a place of festivity. The position, the inclination of
the letters and the diacritics,… …the voicing of the letters due
to the way they are pronounced… …feel to me like
they form a structure… …that illustrates
the entirety of… …the condition
of the letters,… …or if we think of it
rather as a dervish,… …that of a dervish
performing sama. And for this reason, we don’t
merely lay our eyes on the… …calligraphy and
when we look at it. We also read it. Panel Jali Thuluth Calligrapher: Mustafa İzzet Efendi The art of calligraphy has
always existed side by… …side with adab from
beginning to end. Therefore, those who practice
the art should avoid… …straying from the
path of Allah… …even by the breadth of a hair,… …subject themselves to long
and arduous training courses,… …write aplenty and… …be deeply interested in
the works written thus far,… …avoid turning their
hearts towards… …anything other than
the path of Allah,… …submit themselves to a master… …who will give them their license
to practice and be patient… …and compassionate
towards those who wish to… …learn from them about writing. It is this adab
that has preserved… …the art of calligraphy
to this day… …as well as ensured the
raising of new calligraphers… …and allowed the divine
words to be passed… …onto future generations
with worthiness. This, of course, has a
reason: “Qur’an al-Karim” It’s the desire to write the
verses of Allah in a way… …worthy of Allah’s
greatness and glory. No matter where artists
of Islam are in the world,… In Arabia, Damascus,… …Iraq, Turkey, Iran, Middle Asia,
Balkans, North Africa,… …wherever and
whenever they are,… If Muslim artists are
writing the verses of Allah… …when they pick up the pen,… …they have always shown utmost
care and tremendous sensitivity. Because the words they are writing
don’t belong to just anyone. They are the words of Allah. What should be written in the
most excellent way? It should be Allah’s
words that should be… …written in the most
excellent way. Our Prophet Muhammad (S.A.W)
who had a great aesthetic sense… …and refined taste
in all things… …advised his scribe thusly: Put likka inside the inkwell,
shave the pen with a slant… …write the “ba” of
basmala upright,… …take care to draw the teeth
of the letter “sin” and the… …eye of the letter
“meem” clearly… …and write the name of Allah
beautifully and refresh… …your ink when you
get to “Rahman”,… …elongate the bowl of the “noon”
and write “Rahim” nicely. And he has thus advised
that basmala be written in… …a manner that pleases the eye… …and established the
aesthetic values,… …setting the goal of raising the
act of writing into an art form. After advancing under
the protection of the… …Abbasids until the
middle of 1200s,… …superiority in the art of
calligraphy was ceded to the… …Turkish and Iranian
calligraphers… …after the fall of the
Abbasids in 1258. Although Iranian
calligraphers wrote… …the six styles in
their own way,… …they still couldn’t depart
from the old styles. But the Turkish calligraphers,
who were trained… …within the state traditions… …which attached high importance
to knowledge and arts,… …founded an original school. In the course of the
calligraphy before our time… …in the countries and regions
where the art was practiced… …it couldn’t advance a
great deal and these people… …couldn’t establish
a strong presence. But it wasn’t like that
in the Ottoman State. It gave a lot of
weight to the matter. It viewed this art as
an act of worship. Because the area in which
the art of calligraphy… …serves is centered
on Qur’an verses,… …ahadith and religious sources. Service related to the
religious sources is… …considered an act of worship. It’s because people who did
this service perceived… …it as an act of worship that
it could advance further. Hadith Thuluth Naskh Sheikh Hamdullah Diploma Thuluth Naskh Mustafa Rakım Efendi Ali İmran – 37
Jali Thuluth Calligrapher: Çırçırlı Ali Efendi “The Qur’an al-Karim was
sent down in Mecca,… …recited in Cairo… …and written in Istanbul” as a
saying goes in our civilization. The ample attention that
Turkish sultans and… …statesmen showed to
wise people and artists… …ensured that great artists
from around the world began… …to gather in Anatolia from the
middle of the 13th century onward… …and paved the way for the art of
calligraphy to reach its pinnacle. Some of the last works of
the Turkish science and… …art to come out of
Seljukian hands are… …the art of stone
carving derived from the… …Yaqut art embraced
by the Seljuks… …during the years of the
founding of the Ottomans,… …architectural aesthetics
calculated with geometric plans,… …decorative writings and
other art movements. The search for style
within the Ottoman State,… …which inherited
the Seljukian,… …Ghaznian Kara-Khanid
and Byzantine culture,… …was replaced by the
search for perfection… …in every branch of art after
the conquest of Istanbul. The steps taken towards
perfection in this period… …in architecture, music,
poetry, literature,… …gilding and calligraphy… …reached its peak during the
time of Kanuni Sultan Suleyman. And in the 16th century,… …Sheikh Hamdullah,
who is seen as the… …pioneer of Turkish
calligraphers,… …adds a new maturity to
the art of calligraphy… During his time as the
shahzada, Bayezid II sees the… …writings by Sheikh Hamdullah… …while he is staying in Amasya. He realizes that he is
someone skilled in this matter. When he becomes the caliph and
takes his place as the sultan,… …he summons him and tells him
“show us what you can do”. But he doesn’t set himself
upon his work immediately. He goes into a period of
arba’een two or three times. Then, after these experiences,… …he makes a revolution
in writing. With Sheikh Hamdullah,
the Turkish… …style or rather the
Ottoman style begins. He imparted such an air to
the art of writing… There are 6 classical writing… …styles called aqlam al-sittah. Sheikh Hamdullah is the beginning
of the Turkish style… …and the Ottoman style or the… …Istanbul style in
aqlam al-sittah. This style is continued
after Sheikh Hamdullah. The stories of how the
respect afforded to… …calligraphers during
the Ottoman era… …caused jealousy even
amongst the luminaries… …have been passed
from ear to ear… …and become myths that
have reached our time. According to the
stories being told,… …Sultan Bayezid II was
aware of this situation… …and answered those in his
council with a jest-like response: When these rumors and
complaints reached the Sultan… …while Sheikh Hamdullah
was in such a situation,… …he began to stack the books
these scholars wrote and… …the Qur’an that Sheikh
Hamdullah wrote… …in a council of knowledge where
these scholars were present… …seeming all the while to
be in pretend hesitation… …with the Qur’an in his hand… “My Sultan, what is your wish?” He says: “Where shall I place the
Qur’an in my hand? At the bottom?” “My Sultan, how can Qur’an
al-Karim be placed at the bottom? You should put it on top.” Words of the scholars themselves. “If so, where should the
one who wrote it be seated… …in this council?” he says. The scholars get their answer. After that, a generation
rises every hundred years… …that repeats and improves
these principles. Sheikh Hamdullah comes as
the head figure of these… …and Hafiz Osman comes one
hundred years after him. Then comes Rakım, Şevki and others. These writings showed advancement
in certain periods like these… …and reached the point we
have come to today. Hafiz Osman fashioned his
own calligraphy style… …by starting out based on
Sheikh Hamdullah’s style… …in the second half of
the 17th century. As this innovation continued
with all of its magnificence… İsmail Zühdü and his brother
Mustafa Rakım brought… …their writings to the
height of perfection… …at the start of the
18th century… …with inspiration from the
writings of Hafiz Osman. After Sheikh Hamdullah,
Hafiz Osman is the one… …who made the greatest
advancements. Hafiz Osman studied
Sheikh Hamdullah… …along with all the past
calligraphers and everything… …he could get a hold of,… …chose the finest
letters according… …to his aesthetic perception,… …and used them even more
beautifully, of course,… …by adding his own
aesthetic touch. Sultan Mustafa holds Hafiz Osman’s
inkwell as he writes. Then he asks him “Will another… …master like you
ever come again?” “As long as sultans like
you hold the inkwell,… …more will come,” he replies. Turban shaped tombstones with
tulip blossoms all over… …epigraphs worked just
so that it looks as if… …frolicking with the wax,… Minarets soaring into the sky as
if to envelop the earth… Mukabariyas built
with such elegance… …to be worthy of Bilal’s
(r.a) name,… …plates too large to
fit through doors,… …ceramic tiles embellished
with a carnival of colors… …words of the old and
many other works of art… …are the ones that survived
to this day from the point the… …Ottomans have brought
the art of calligraphy. Having reached the stage
of classical maturity… …at the start of
the 19th century,… …calligraphy lost its luster… …with developments
emerging at the end of this… …century such as social crises,… …economic collapse and the press
becoming widely available… …whilst the intellectuals
and statesmen of this period… …directed their attention
elsewhere and thus,… …the popularity of the art of
calligraphy began to decline. Noticing the severity of the
situation, Sheikh al-Islam… …Hayri Efendi and his
close coworkers… …founded a calligraphy
school in 1915 by the… …name of Madrasat’ul Hattatin. The valuable artists who were
educated in this institution,… …which graduated 13 students
in 1918 and 20 in 1923,… …saved the art of calligraphy
from dying out… …and established a strong
ground for the republic era. When Madrasat’ul
Hattatin was founded,… …all of the instructors there
were students of Sami Efendi. The Reis’ul Hattatin of his time. A tremendously masteful
side of him was that… …he could set down
compositions of jali writings… …using only one lead pencil… …right down to the diacritics. Take the pencils and
retrace the letters. You’ll find that
it’s identical. This indicates the very
height in writing. With the alphabet revolution
and cultural shift… …that took place after the
founding of the republic,… …the changing
social dynamics… …caused calligraphy
to become an art… …that got relegated to
a lesser position. Calligrapher Hamid Aytaç,… …who worked selflessly to keep
the art of calligraphy… …alive after the
alphabet revolution… …while facing hardships,… …who passed on all of his
knowledge and skills to… …future generations
with no charge,… …recounts the period after the
alphabet revolution as follows. “When the alphabet revolution
entered into force,… …there were three
hundred and fifty… …calligraphy workshops
on Ankara Avenue. All of these workshops
closed down overnight. Because when the old
alphabet became abolished,… …everyone closed shop. But I didn’t. I did other things
to make a living. I worked on the science of
calligraphy in the meantime.” Hamid Aytaç tries to earn his… …livelihood in those
years by doing… …zincography, label printing,
painting and engraving,… …he considers
himself duty-bound… …to pass his knowledge
onto the future generations… …and he practices
writing unceasingly. The fact that he didn’t
take time off from… …writing even in his sick bed… …despite the changes in the
perception of art, letters,… …mentality and social
structure goes to show how much… …he cared about this duty. Hamit Bey really acted as
a fundamental bridge. He always said this when
he was in good health: “My son, Allah sent me with a duty.” I bear witness that he fulfilled
his duty fully and completely… …so that the art of writing
could be passed on from… …the Ottomans to our time. Because the writings, the alphabet
and the minds changed. A full opposition is formed
against that which is old… Someone is trying to
continue his life by… …writing in such a situation… …because he feels duty-bound. He had his own printing press. Zingcography, label printing,
painting, engraving… He tried to make a
living out of these… …as well but he never
quit writing. The longest period of time he took
off from writing is 21 days. He stayed in a hospital for some
time and was kept from writing. Besides that, he never took a break. The most important thing about
Calligrapher Hamit Aytaç is that… …he passed away at the
age of 91 and… …if we consider the fact that
he started writing when he was 9… …he must have written
for 80 years. He spent his last
year at the hospital. Despite that, he would
take out the pens… …and the ink from
the nightstand… …and give us
exercise work whenever… …we went to visit him
at the hospital. Allah doesn’t grant just
anyone the opportunity to… …practice this art for 80 years. You may not believe it but once
when I attended his class,… …he was sleeping. He was almost asleep. I placed the exercise in front
of him and realized that… …he was going to write it. The “Rabbi yessir” exercise,
the first years. He was writing but his eyes
were closing shut. I said “Ustad, let me leave now
and come back next week.” We would do the
exercises on Saturdays. “No, no, we can write” he said. When he said that, I no
longer had a say in it. He began and wrote
“te” and then “‘ayn”. He went onto the first and
second teeth of the “sin”. Just as he was drawing the third
tooth, his eyes closed shut. I keep looking from
the master’s eye… …to his hand and how
the pen moves. I expect his hand to halt
or make a wrong move. You may not believe it but
he finished the second… …tooth of the “sin”
his eyes closed. Then his hand rose up for
the third tooth and made it… …back down to finish the “ra”. He opened his eyes to see if
he did something wrong. He noticed that everything was
fine so he continued. I was baffled, shocked. I kept telling about this
everywhere I went for a week. The man wrote in his sleep. He wrote in his sleep
right before my eyes. Now one should think
about this: 80 years… …Allah (swt) hasn’t bestowed
such a gift upon everyone. Writing the letters of the
Qur’an for 80 years. Being able to do this
shouldn’t be seen as too much. Call it karamah or
whatever you want. Or call it reflex, however
you explain this. But I just can’t forget that he
wrote out the letter in his sleep. This is such a love that
it has sometimes been an… …inspiration for the
lame hands,… …sometimes for the
sightless eyes… …and sometimes for the
hopeless hearts. But for the sake of such
love, it’s necessary to… …endure all kinds of
oppression,… …exile and restrictions
in addition to… …bearing with the
usual difficulties,… …setting the worries
of life aside,… …showing patience
and perseverance. It has become extremely
difficult and grueling for the… …masters living in the last
period of the Ottomans… …to practice the art of
calligraphy and pass their… …knowledge onto the
next generation. Staying faithful to
their traditions… …even in the years
of prohibition,… …the calligraphers
are the pillars of our… …civilization that
have supported it. Because calligraphy is
not only fine writing,… …but it is the
language of an ancient… …civilization and a
region without borders. More than the troubles that
transpired in his time,… …it caused greater
distress to Hamid Aytaç,… …who played an important role in
transferring this language… …from the Ottomans
over to the Republic,… …that he couldn’t find aspiring
students who were patient… …and determined enough to give
themselves over to writing. Because no young person
who came to Hamit Aytaç… …could find the courage… …to write the “Rabbi
yassir” panel… …which is considered to be the
beginning of the art of calligraphy. Because most of the time, the… …first lecture takes
months to complete. The young, on the other
hand, had a short-lived… …enthusiasm that burned
out in a few days. In 1964, there comes a knock on
Calligrapher Hamid’s door… …with an enthusiasm
unlike any that came before. The one who came this time
had a determination on… …his face to learn and
teach calligraphy… …who was also a real doer to… …carry this duty to
future generations. They take a few
lessons, show up for a… …couple of months and then quit. He thought I was another such
fickle-natured person. He waited for me to quit
and leave but once he saw… …that I wasn’t going anywhere, he
didn’t say anything about it. He is the one who has trained
the highest number of… …certified students in the
last century and a half. He is the Reis’ul Hattatin. He’d say this about writing.
His own words: “If I hadn’t found Hamit
Bey and learned to write,… …I’d have burned to
ashes like Kerem.” This isn’t something that
any artist can say. The art of writing has ingrained
itself so deep into his soul. With whatever means available in
his time, barely managing… He had no longing for wealth. He had no longing to reach a
position of power or authority. He’d just given himself
over to writing. From the earliest years I could
recall my father,… …the one thing I could
remember about him… …was that he was always
working on his writing. That’s how I saw my father
in my early ages. When our ustad came to
Hamit bey after many… …hardships and
became his student,… …he spends 18 years
under his tutelage. Our ustad practices the
“Rabbi Yassir” for 2.5 years. He says that Ustad Hamit speaks
very little during this practice… …and Ustad Hamit performs his
corrections without speaking. Then he returns the
lecture material. Our ustad says
“everything I learned,… …I learned from that silence.” Each ustad has his
own way of teaching. For example, some
ustads speak very little. Some others are too detail-oriented. This can create a pressure
on the students. What I saw in Ustad
Hasan is that… …he gave the students
their lectures according to… …the students’ conditions
and by understanding them. The ustad generally adopts an
enabling attitude for the students. I had observations of other
ustads both during our… …conversations and during our
visits regarding their methods. I have seen the ustad to
adopt an approach that… …makes thins easier, not harder. An approach that enables
the student’s progress. In a time when calligraphy was… …completely taken
off the agenda,… …putting his heart into
calligraphy 60-70 years ago… …he became a bridge between
the past and the present… …and thanks to that
bridge, Alhamdulillah,… …calligraphy began to
reach its former level. It began to regain its former… …beauty and value. Of course, we had other
calligraphers in the past. But we know that Calligrapher Hamit
has been the lodestar for this work. Because, by giving
these lectures… …when there was no
one else to do so… …and by training pupils,
he broke a new ground in… …keeping this art alive. One of his students is
our ustad Hasan Çelebi. Through our ustad Hasan Çelebi,
who is a very productive person,… …many students were educated. Most of these students
are successful students. They are individuals who
have proven themselves… …within and outside of Turkey
and they are still productive. For that reason, our ustad’s
service to the art of… …calligraphy is undeniable. Our ustad Hasan Çelebi is
the standard bearer of… …this art from the
past into the future. No doubt. Yes, we do have other calligraphers. We have calligraphers who produce
world-renowned, exquisite works. But carrying this art,
carrying its DNA,… …and the duty of passing the
knowledge to future generations… …weighed mostly on
Ustad Hasan Çelebi… …and he fulfilled his duty, may
Allah be pleased with him. Our ustad fulfilled the
responsibilities of… …this work by training
many students… …not just in Turkey but
all around the world,… …in the north, the
south, the east, the west,… …in Africa, Arabian Peninsula,… …by looking out for these
students in Istanbul,… …perhaps even by arranging
a home for them… …or even having them as
his guest in his own home. The art of calligraphy has nothing
to do with wealth and fame. “We must strive each year
and become better than… …we were in the previous
one,” he used to say. He always advised us
to teach this art to… …students younger
than ourselves. He taught us to bring this
accumulated knowledge to… …our country when we got back. Muhammed Suleyman Hube
received his diploma… …in the field of thuluth naskh
from Ustad Hasan Çelebi. Opening his first
exhibition in 1982… in Research Center For Islamic
History, Art and Culture,… …Hasan Çelebi had now become… …one of the top figures
of the art of calligraphy. From the Rawda al-Mutahhara to the
masjids of Kuba and Kiblatayn,… …and to the great places of
worship in Madina al-Munawwara,… …Hasan Çelebi
is the go-to name… …for the inscription
and stacking works. Hasan Çelebi, who has
his signature on many… …calligraphy arts in the
mosques in our country,… …also has personally done
the calligraphy work of… …Almati Central Jum’a
Mosque in Kazakhstan,… …Forstyam Fatih Mosque
in Germany,… …Genk Yunus Emre
Mosque in Belgium… …and Mostar Nezir Ağa
Mosque in Bosnia. Art-wise, he is a
great calligrapher. As a person, our ustad surely
has a very strong manawi side. He is full of
ikhlas, perhaps the… …reason why he rose to
this level in his art… …is his ikhlas, his loyalty. His loyalty to his ustad,
the late calligrapher Hamit… …feels touching to me. For instance, calligrapher Hamit
gets sick in his last days. He stays in a small room
at the inn in Sirkeci. Our ustad constantly visits him,
takes care of his condition,… …takes him to the hospital. Once, our ustad carries
him on his back. Picks him up and takes
him on his back. That story really touches me. Because a man can do this
probably only for his own father. Our ustad’s loyalty affects
me so much, gets me so emotional. Perhaps the reason for
him to rise to such heights… …Alhamdulillah, our ustad
was deemed worthy of the… …greatest award of our state,… …the Presidential Culture
and Art Grand Award. His climbing to
such heights in the… …eyes of the state
and state officials… …and him being
praised like this. That’s what I attribute it to. His loyalty towards his ustad,
his ikhlas and modesty. We kindly invite Hasan Çelebi
to the stage who has been… …deemed worthy of receiving award
in the traditional arts branch. Gold doesn’t lose its value by
being dropped to the ground. It doesn’t lose value by
being covered in mud. The art of calligraphy was dropped
to the ground for that period. Hifz’ul Qur’an,
qiraat, tilawat and… …focusing on these
types of work,… …gaining depth in
Islamic sciences… …seemed to have lost its
value in that period. Let’s not say it lost its value. No one respected these
sciences, no one paid heed. But our ustad and
people like him… …upheld and uplifted this art. They uplifted this art and
this art uplifted them. This work bestowed these
stations upon them. Born in the years during
which the greatest and… …bloodiest wars of
mankind began,… …Hasan Çelebi came to this
world in a 150-house village… …named İnci which is part of
the Oltu district of Erzurum. He was burdened by the maturity
of witnessing a war that caused… …the deaths of 50 million
people in his childhood years. In those times, times that
passed as harsh as the… …cold weather of
Erzurum that chills… …people every season
of the year,… …the great ustad was
able to overcome the cold,… …the hunger and all
of his troubles… …by virtue of his love
for the paper. Certainly, it would take
more than these difficulties… …to discourage a young
heart that was burning up… …with the desire to make
use of even tiny scraps of… …paper since his childhood days. He was yet to be introduced to the
calligraphy paper, inkwell and ink. But he was aware of that
long, arduous road and… …that his goal is
nowhere near him. Bismillah. A pen might be a piece of straw
plucked from a reed bed. You could call it a piece
of wood as well. But when it comes to writing,
that straw begins to… …speak like a human being. A Life Dedicated to Calligraphy,
First Episode on March 1st On Semerkand TV,
every Friday at 20:00

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